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Oceans of Opportunity: International cooperation and partnership across the Pacific.
| For Educators | Education Symposium |

“Oceans of Opportunity” Education Symposium

The OCEANS Conference series is the largest international professional meeting and exposition devoted to the full spectrum of ocean sciences, technology, policy, engineering, and education. During OCEANS '11 MTS/IEEE Kona conference a number of exciting ocean science professional development opportunities will be offered to educators on Saturday, 17 September 2011 at the site of the conference in Hawaii.

The “Oceans of Opportunity” Education Symposium includes full-day and half-day sessions, lunch, and an Education Plenary on the Mariana Trench Marine National Monument. Topics of the Symposium include Pacific Corals and Climate Change, Sound in the Sea, and Ocean Exploration in the Mariana Trench Marine National Monument. All Education Symposium sessions will be held on Saturday, 17 September. Below is the Symposium schedule. 

Click here to download the PDF flyer.

If you have questions, please email the OCEANS ’11 Education team at: education@oceans11mtsieeekona.org

Symposium Schedule (All Sessions on Saturday, 17 September)


Title Presenter

Time

Room

Keynote Luncheon:
Developing an Exploration and Research Science Plan for the Mariana Trench Marine National Monument 
By Eric Breuer, Jacob Asher and Heidi Hirsh- The National Marine Fisheries Service

12:00

Kona 4

Pacific Coral Reefs and Climate Change Module Workshop
By Dr. Laura Murray, Research Professor, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

09:00-15:00

Kona 1

Discovery of Sound in the Sea
By Gail Scowcroft, Associate Director, Office of Marine Programs, URI Graduate School of Oceanography and Executive Director, National Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence Network

09:00-12:00
and
13:00-16:00

Kona 2

Why Should We Explore the Mariana Trench Marine National Monument?
By Paula Keener, Director, Education Programs, NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and Susan Haynes, Education Program Manager, NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

09:00-12:00
and
13:00-16:00

Kona 3 

 

Developing an Exploration and Research Science Plan for the Mariana Trench Marine National Monument

By Eric Breuer, Jacob Asher and Heidi Hirsh- The National Marine Fisheries Service

Keynote Luncheon, 12:00

The Marianas Trench Marine National Monument (MTMNM) was designated in 2009 and includes the waters and submerged lands of the three northernmost Mariana Islands (the ‘‘Islands Unit’’), the submerged lands of designated volcanic sites (the ‘‘Volcanic Unit’’) and the Mariana Trench (the ‘‘Trench Unit’’).

The Mariana Trench is the “Grand Canyon” of the ocean (actually 120 times larger), with some of the deepest known places on earth. The region is geologically very complex, including a subduction zone, back arc basins, and active and simmering island and submarine volcanoes. The waters of the archipelago’s northern islands are among the most biologically diverse in the Western Pacific and include the greatest diversity of seamount and hydrothermal vent life yet discovered. These volcanic islands are ringed by coral ecosystems with very high numbers of apex predators, including large numbers of sharks. They also contain one of the most diverse collections of stony corals in the Western Pacific. The northern islands and shoals in the archipelago have substantially higher large fish biomass, including apex predators, than the southern islands and Guam.

The MTMNM Science Exploration and Research Workshop will:

  • Review the current state of the science of the MTMNM
  • Identify gaps and opportunities in the current scientific information in order to provide the best available science for management of the MTMNM
  • Using an ecosystem approach to management, the workshop will prioritize the identified gaps and provide recommendations on the best and most efficient exploration and research methodologies to address the data gaps in the MTMNM, taking into account both short and long-term goals.

 

Pacific Coral Reefs and Climate Change Module Workshop

By Dr. Laura Murray, Research Professor, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

9:00 AM – 3:00 PM, Maximum 40 participants

Understanding and exploring our intricate connections to coral reefs and climate change takes the knowledge of many people. That is why the Pacific Island Network Inventory and Monitoring Program of the National Park Service spearheaded a special partnership with their Network resource managers and interpretation staff, students, educators, science communicators, and cultural experts. This partnership supported a fellowship team that synthesized park science and integrated cultural knowledge to produce the content presented in a Pacific Coral Reefs and Climate Change Module. The team consisted of a high school science teacher from Kahuku High and Intermediate School, a graduate student from the University of Hawaii at Hilo, and two undergraduate students at the university participating in the Pacific Islands Partnerships for Exploring Science program. With the help of science communicators from the Integration and Application Network, and the National Park Service, team members explored coral ecosystems, interviewed park staff, talked with local teachers, created synthetic visuals, and designed classroom and online activities focused on communicating the importance of corals in the Pacific Islands and how their future will be impacted by climate change. This one day professional development workshop will introduce educators to the Pacific Coral Reefs and Climate Change Module, following the National Park Service and COSEE Coastal Trends’ educational module on Coral Reefs and Climate Change. Open to teachers of all grade levels.

For more details, visit: http://www1.coseecoastaltrends.net/modules/corals_and_climate_change/get_started/

 

Discovery of Sound in the Sea

By Gail Scowcroft, Associate Director, Office of Marine Programs, URI Graduate School of Oceanography and Executive Director, National Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence Network

9: 00 AM – 12:00 PM, Maximum 30 participants

1:00 PM – 4:00 PM, Maximum 30 participants

Abstract physical and biological science concepts can be challenging for students to grasp. Exposure to how these concepts are reflected in natural world phenomena provides tangible examples through which learners can access the process of science. Experiences can be gained through related inquiry-based activities that inspire learners to develop a deeper understanding of the science. This workshop will provide opportunities for middle and high school level educators to make connections between the phenomena of underwater sound and their education activities. The science of underwater sound, the production of sound, and the impact of anthropogenic sound on marine life will be discussed as participants engage in related science activities. Online resources will be shared, including an audio gallery of the underwater sounds produced by animals, people, and the natural world. Participants will receive free CD-ROMS to use with their students.

For more details, visit: http://www.dosits.org/

 

Why Should We Explore the Mariana Trench Marine National Monument?

By Paula Keener, Director, Education Programs, NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and Susan Haynes, Education Program Manager, NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

9: 00 AM – 12:00 PM, Maximum 30 participants

1:00 PM – 4:00 PM, Maximum 30 participants

All life on Earth depends on the ocean— yet, the ocean is 95 percent unexplored, unknown and unseen by human eyes. On January 6, 2009, a small portion of our unknown ocean was designated through Presidential Proclamation as the Mariana Trench Marine National Monument (MTMNM) and a program was called for “to assess and promote monument-related scientific exploration and research…”. Join staff from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and the National Marine Fisheries Service as you learn about science planning, current research and exploration in the MTMNM. Participants will learn why ocean exploration and research are critical in the MTMNM and will be introduced by scientists and ocean science educators to inquiry- and standards-based lesson plans for students in grades 5-12 that have been developed based on ocean exploration expeditions in the Monument area. Participants will be given ocean exploration curriculum materials and other resources to support the introduction of this exciting and engaging topic in their classrooms.

For more details, visit: http://www.fws.gov/marianastrenchmarinemonument/ 
and http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/06fire/welcome.html

 

Registration

Deadline: 9 September 2011

To register for the education symposium, please download the Registration Form as a (PDF) or MS-Word (DOC).  
Email the completed form to the Education Team at education@oceans11mtsieeekona.org.

 
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